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Single Sandwich Bread Loaf

By Ned Lowery

I have been using your starter for several months now and have adopted a very simple recipe for a single sandwich bread loaf that is nothing short of delicious. It can easily be divided to make two small round loaves as well. With just my wife and myself eating the bread most of the time, we don't need large loaves and we can use one of these before it goes stale. Thanks for the wonderful starter. Here is the "procedure."

I would like to update the recipe on your web site attributed to Ned Lowery. A couple of points need to be revised because of an apparent oversight when I originally sent it. Believe we have had the starter about two years now and it seems to get better with time. If you will, please change the recipe to read as follows:

I have been using your starter for several months now and have adopted a very simple recipe for a single sandwich bread loaf that is nothing short of delicious. It can easily be divided to make two small round loaves as well. With just my wife and myself eating the bread most of the time, we don't need large loaves and we can use one of these before it goes stale. Thanks for the wonderful starter. Here is the "procedure."

The night before baking, mix one and one-half cups flour (all purpose or " Better-for-Bread") and an equal amount of water. Add about one-eighth cup starter and stir well. Let proof overnight at room temperature.

Next morning, add about a tablespoon of salt about a tablespoon of vegetable oil, two and one-half cups flour and mix with (KitchenAid) mixer until it forms a ball. (It certainly may be mixed and kneaded by hand but the mixer does most of the work if available.) Place in greased bowl and let rise for 75 to 90 minutes. Turn out on lightly floured cutting board and knead just enough to remove the bubbles and form into an oblong loaf for fitting into a loaf pan (I like to use a stone one.) Press the dough level into the pan and let rise about 90 minutes until desired height for baking.

Just before baking, make about quarter inch deep slits along both sides of the loaf. Bake at 400° for first 10 minutes and then 350° for remaining 30 minutes (total of 40 minutes.) I like to mist/spray the bread at 10 minutes and again at 20 minutes into the bake cycle. Turn onto a wire rack to cool.

 

 

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